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Agnes Ethel Dinwoodie

Wallasey News, Saturday, June 13th, 1914.

The Lost Stewardesses

Only one of the ten stewardesses employed on the Empress of Ireland escaped with her life, among those lost being Miss Ethel Dinwoodie, of 32 Church Street, Egremont, and Mrs Leders, a widow, of 25, Duke Street, New Brighton.

The sole survivor, Mrs Helena Hollis, of Liverpool, rushed on deck clad only in a night-dress.  Miss Dinwoodie and another stewardess accompanied her, and all three plunged into the water as the liner heeled over.  They endeavoured to keep together, but were drawn down by the suction and thus were separated.  Mrs Hollis is inclined to ascribe the sad fate of Miss Dinwoodie, who was a swimmer, to the fact that she was hampered by having put on a couple of coats.

“All around us,” says the survivor, “was a mass of struggling people and a great quantity of wreckage which hindered us from swimming clear away.  After a minute or two I saw Miss Dinwoodie sink and this time she did not come up.  It is a pity she put on those two coats.”

 

ALSO AGNES ETHEL

ELDEST DAUGHTER OF THE ABOVE,

WAS LOST WITH THE “EMPRESS OF IRELAND”,

29TH MAY 1914 AGED 29 YEARS’